May Meeting!!! Forrest’s Railroad Raid of 1864!

May 17th, 2017 – Our 156th meeting.  We continue our eleventh year!

The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, May 17th, 2017 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Tennova Hospital.  This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall.  The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

Our Speaker and Topic  – “Forrest’s Railroad Raid of 1864”

Throughout the summer of 1864 Confederate General Joe Johnston had been begging Richmond to send Nathan Bedford Forrest to break Sherman’s supply lines during the Atlanta campaign.  Fully aware of Forrest’s prowess as a raider, Union commander Gen. William T. Sherman had cannily arranged raids into Mississippi that kept Forrest tied down in the Magnolia State.  These culminated on the battles at Brice’s Crossroads and Tupelo/Harrisburg.  In mid July, Johnston got fired, his replacement John Bell Hood was unable to hold Atlanta, and finally, after Atlanta surrendered on September 2nd, Forrest was ordered to leave Mississippi and go after Sherman’s railroads in Middle Tennessee and northern Alabama.  This is the story of that raid—highly successful at the tactical level but its subtitle could be “Two Months Late and a Division Short.”  In the end, Sherman’s strategic plan to keep Forrest off of his railroads worked.

Our speaker this month is Brig. Gen. John Scales (Ret.).  An Alabama native, General Scales attended the University of Alabama 1966-70, graduating in 1970 with a degree in physics and a commission as an infantry lieutenant in the U. S. Army. He graduated from infantry officer basic, airborne and Ranger schools before being assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division. Later he led a rifle platoon in combat in Vietnam and joined the 101st Airborne upon return to the US. Leaving active duty in 1975, he joined the 20th Special Forces Group of the Alabama National Guard while getting a master’s degree at the University and becoming Special Forces qualified. Over the years, while first teaching and later working as a scientist in Huntsville, he commanded a Special Forces A Detachment, company, battalion, and the 20th itself.  He was selected for promotion to general and assignment to US Army Special Forces Command, where he was first deputy commander and later acting commander. After 9/11 he was assigned to the Joint Special Operations Command and led a Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force in Afghanistan. General Scales retired from the military in late 2002 and continued his career as a scientist in Huntsville, being granted five patents and publishing two military history books, with another scheduled to be published this summer.

Last Month’s meeting

Robert Hodge gave us an informative program on the Battle of Spotylvania Courthouse, the first major fight of the Overland Campaign pitting Robert E. Lee versus Ulysses S. Grant for the first time.  The great movements of Grant, heading to Richmond knowing that Lee’s army would place itself in between that city and Grant, was Grant’s great plan; to wear down Lee at every turn.  Indeed, while costing tremendous casualties by campaign’s end, Grant had forced Lee into the defenses of Richmond and later Petersburg, costing him the ability to maneuver which he did so well.  Hodge is not only a fine filmmaker but also a fine historian and we thank him for his program.

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

June 2017 – Steve Davis, author/historian – “Bonnie Blue Flop: The Relationship Between Beauregard and Hood On The Tennessee Campaign of 1864.”

July 2017 – David Deatrick, Louisville CWRT – “Kentucky Union General Lovell Rosseau”

August 2017 – Todd Van Beck, Nashville CWRT – “Civil War Embalming Surgeons: They Changed Everything.”

September 2017 – Allen Mesch, author/historian – “General Charles F. Smith” (based on his book)

October 2017 – Edward Semmes, historian – “Confederate Admiral Raphael Semmes”

November 2017 – Scott Sallee, historian/author – “Joe Porter’s War: The Civil War in Northeast Missouri, 1862” (based on his book)

December 2017 – Jim Lewis, Chief Ranger, Stones River National Battlefield – topic TBA

IMPORTANT –  MEMBERS AND DUES: DUES ARE DUE AT THE JULY 2017 MEETING.  WHEN YOU ARE CURRENT YOU WILL GET A NEW CWRT MEMBERSHIP CARD FOR THE NEXT FISCAL YEAR.  Thanks to all of you, the Clarksville CWRT continues to grow.  We would love to have you join us!  If you have friends interested in the Civil War, please bring them along.  July is our fiscal year when dues for the current campaign were due.  If you haven’t paid your dues for this season yet please do so.  Our dues help us get great speakers and for historical preservation.  Annual dues are as follows:

  • Student – $10
  • Single membership – $20
  • Family – $30
  • Military – Active duty and veterans – $15
  • Military family – Active duty, veterans, and family – $25

Please plan on paying your dues at this month’s meeting.  If you cannot attend please send payment to Greg Biggs, 2600 W. Henderson Way, Clarksville, TN 37042.

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A NAME TAG THEN YOU ARE NOT CURRENT WITH YOUR DUES.  PLEASE PAY AT THIS MEETING AND GET CURRENT SO WE CAN CONTINUE TO BRING FINE PROGRAMS.

CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

Fort Negley Park Area Under Development Threat

On April 28th, 2017, reporter Betsy Phillips wrote the following article in the weekly Nashville Scene paper:

Developers Propose the Desecration of Fort Negley

Shame on us if we let it happen

WKRN has a story about a proposed development around Fort Negley:

On Tuesday, we heard from a developer who has big plans for the empty property (Greer Stadium site): a multi-purpose complex called Nashville Adventure Park.”

“The proposal includes senior living, luxury apartments, townhomes, affordable housing, a farmer’s market at the stadium, artisan retail and studios, restaurants, a hotel, and a wide variety of sports offerings.”

“If you imagine the hill that the main part of the fort sits on as an egg yolk, this development would be like the egg white, seeming to completely surround the fort, except for where the Adventure Science Center sits.”

“In other words, the old Catholic Cemetery and the large City Cemetery annexes that the Union opened during the Civil War would all be gone. And, fine, they’re supposed to be empty anyway, but if I were a developer, I’d put a line in my budget for dead parts removal.”

“More disturbingly and more tragically, this development sits on the site of the contraband camp, the home of thousands of black refugees during the Civil War. As Zada Law pointed out two years ago, there’s been virtually no archaeology done at any contraband camp in Tennessee.”

“We’ve already irretrievably lost whatever was under the Adventure Science Center, but a lot remains relatively undisturbed. Even the parts under the parking lot are just under a parking lot. We have not yet screwed up a crucial bit of Nashville’s African American history, even if we haven’t bothered to explore it like we should. But if we let developers have it, then that history will be lost. Sure, some archaeologists could come in and do history triage to try to learn as much as they could before it’s torn up, but the Civil War isn’t that far down in the ground. We will lose it.”

“And frankly, how much more of our Civil War history do we have to lose? We already put I-440 on top of the Confederate line and built a city on the battlefield. One of the most important battles of the Civil War and we let Franklin and Murfreesboro be the tourist destinations while we metaphorically kick the rug over what’s left of our Civil War sites.”

“Shame on us if we let this development happen.  Shame on us if we knowingly let this history slip away.”

Here is what the proposed development looks like:

aerial-view-farmers-market-rendering

Somewhere in the middle of this monstrosity lies Fort Negley and the visitors center.  Note that the parking for the latter has not been expanded.  It has been proven time and again that history tourism brings in far more money than any other – people have more to spend, stay longer, etc. if you give them something to see and promote it so they know about it.  The traffic count for the area will explode making it even more difficult to get to the fort to visit.  Don’t believe me?  Look at what has happened at the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, VA with the massive growth of Virginia Commonwealth University around it; their attendance has fallen off to the point that they are moving to new quarters down on the James River.

Traffic comes with big cities.  But traffic also drives people away from doing things just so they do not have to deal with it.  People spend enough time in traffic just going to and from work five days a week; they do not want to deal with it on weekends when they want to do something fun.

Ms. Phillips’ article also brings out the tremendous loss of historic ground upon which sits the fort and its surrounding area, which was all part of the fort’s footprint.  Shall Nashville follow the same mistaken path that Atlanta did many years ago by paving over its history from the Civil War?  How does this travesty being proposed in Nashville compare to what is happening just a few miles down the road in Franklin where they lead the nation in reclaiming lost Civil War land and restoring it to how it looked over 150 years ago?  It is a pathetic failure on Nashville’s part.

Like so many other cities, Nashville has lots of places that are basically blight that can be redeveloped into something like in the above drawing; places that are not historic Civil War lands.  How about moving this thing there instead and leave Fort Negley be?

If you want to help stop this development, please contact the Mayor of Nashville, Megan Berry, and the Nashville Metro City Council.  You should also contact the City of Nashville Metro Parks department and let them know how you feel about this.  The city’s web site is www.nashville.govLet them hear the voices of the Civil War community of America and stop this development.

By Greg Biggs (The above is the opinion of Greg Biggs, president of the Clarksville CWRT and not necessarily the opinion of the Clarksville CWRT as a whole or the staff of Fort Negley Park, a unit of Nashville Metro City parks.)

Kennesaw State University in Georgia Announces New Seminar – June 2017

General Orders, Headquarters, Kennesaw, Ga., May 2017
Next on the power-packed schedule for 2017 are the Second Annual Vince Dooley Leadership Seminar on June 17 and the ever-popular Collector’s Showcase on July 22. In addition to the legendary coach himself, Craig Symonds highlights the program for the Dooley Seminar, with an examination of leadership exhibited during the crucial D-Day operation in the Second World War, while Dr. Wills will assess unique aspects of Civil War leadership.

Although operating through the University, the Civil War Center depends upon the generous financial contributions of friends and donors to function. We could not offer programs such as these without your support and attendance. This critical assistance builds the foundation for future activities and enables the Center to serve both students and members of the wider public community. We continue to invite you to join or re-enroll in the Kennesaw Corps Annual Membership through which members receive special discounts or admission to many of the Center’s activities. Please plan to join us at all of these events and bring friends so that they can see the enthusiasm and excitement for themselves and enjoy the educational opportunities they provide. We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

 

Kentucky Historical Society Hosts Seminar On Kentucky’s Civil War Governors – June 2017

 

The Kentucky Historical Society presents:

2017 Civil War Governors of Kentucky Symposium

June 8 & 9

Join us as we bring together noted historians to help chart the future of 19th century historiography in the Upper South. Faculty and graduate students will have a rare opportunity to see new trends and important research questions developing before they are in print.

 

Twelve prominent scholars from universities across the U.S. and Great Britain will gather to present new work from the Civil War Governors of Kentucky Digital Documentary Edition and discuss the new types of analysis that this innovative digital history project will allow historians to undertake.

 

Sessions all day on June 8 and on the morning of June 9 in the historic Old State Capitol will feature discussions centered on new work on warfare, gender, economics, material culture, slavery and more.
Click here for more information about participants and topics.
Workshop Session on the afternoon of June 8 for teachers at all levels and public historians will collaboratively address ways to incorporate CWGK primary sources into creative and innovative classroom activities and exhibits.

 

Lunch & Reception included in ticket price will give guests the opportunity to interact and network with symposium participants.

 

The keynote speaker is Edward L. Ayres.

 

$25 KHS Members and Students* | $30 Others Price includes box lunch and evening reception.   Reservations required by 5 p.m., June 5.  Call 502-564-1792, ext. 4408

 

The Kentucky Historical Society is located at 100 W. Broadway, Frankfort KY 40601

KHSMedia@ky.gov  (502) 564-1792

January Meeting Notice and Newsletter

 

January 18th, 2017 – Our 153rd meeting.  We continue our eleventh year!

The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, Jauary 18th, 2017 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Tennova Hospital.  This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall.  The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

Our Speaker and Topic  – “Camp McDonald – Training Camp for Georgia Troops”

 

Big Shanty, Georgia got its name because of the railroad worker shanties built there when the Western & Atlantic Railroad was being built in the 1850s.  The town is now better known as Kennesaw, Georgia.

 

During the Civil war, two major events took place here.  The first and most important was the site of Camp McDonald, which became the largest training camp for Georgia troops in the state.  Numerous regiments formed and trained here before being sent off to fight in the Eastern and Western Theaters of the Civil War.

 

The second event was the taking of the famous locomotive, “The General,” by Union spies while on its breakfast stop in Big Shanty in April 1862.  The mission was to burn the railroad bridges north of here on the run to Chattanooga to prevent Confederate reinforcements from being sent to help that city, then under threat from a Union offensive in northern Alabama.

 

While most of Camp McDonald has been built over, efforts have been made recently to preserve portions of the training camp for interpretation and public visitation.  It has been opened for some time now and is part of the Civil War history of Kennesaw along with the Southern Museum for Civil War and Locomotive History nearby.

 

Our speaker this month is Michael Shaffer from Kennesaw, Georgia.  He holds BA and MA degrees in Military History and serves on the board of the Chattahoochee River Line Historic Area as well as being a member of the Society of Civil War Historians, Historians of the Civil War Western Theater and is the consultant for the Friends of Camp McDonald.  Michael writes a regular column for Civil War News and is also an instructor at Kennesaw State University in the Civil War field and lectures across the country.

 

He is also the author of the book, “Washington County, Virginia in the Civil War,” and will have copies of his book for sale at the meeting.

 

Last Month’s meeting

 

Unfortunately, Dr. James McDonough had to cancel due to illness last month and we hope to have him later this year.

 

Our own Krista Castillo gave us a fine program comparing and contrasting women in the Civil War era and World War One.    The changes in American society in the Civil War with so many women going to work in ordnance and quartermaster facilities in addition to becoming nurses changed the social structure of the time.  Women indeed showed they could do a number of jobs outside of the home – and this did not count the women who ran family farms while their husbands were in the military.  It set the tone for World War 1, where women not only did many of the same jobs as those in the Civil War, but they also served in the military itself in a number of positions that freed up men for the combat arms.  The program was well detailed with slides including a number of World War One propaganda posters that featured women urging them to step up to the defense of their nation.  Well researched and presented, Krista did a fine job of connecting the women of the two eras.  Thanks for stepping in on very short notice.

 

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

 

February 2017 – Robert Hodge, historian, film maker – “The Battle of Spotsylvania” (based on his recent film)

March 2017 – Brian Allison, historian/author – “Murder And Mayhem in Nashville” (based on his new book)

April 2017 – Allen Mesch, author/historian – “General Charles F. Smith” (based on his book)

IMPORTANT –  MEMBERS AND DUES: DUES ARE DUE AT THE JULY 2016 MEETING.  WHEN YOU ARE CURRENT YOU WILL GET A NEW CWRT MEMBERSHIP CARD FOR THE NEXT FISCAL YEAR.  Thanks to all of you, the Clarksville CWRT continues to grow.  We would love to have you join us!  If you have friends interested in the Civil War, please bring them along.  July is our fiscal year when dues for the current campaign were due.  If you haven’t paid your dues for this season yet please do so.  Our dues help us get great speakers and for historical preservation.  Annual dues are as follows:

  • Student – $10
  • Single membership – $20
  • Family – $30
  • Military – Active duty and veterans – $15
  • Military family – Active duty, veterans, and family – $25

Please plan on paying your dues at this month’s meeting.  If you cannot attend please send payment to Greg Biggs, 2600 W. Henderson Way, Clarksville, TN 37042.

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A NAME TAG THEN YOU ARE NOT CURRENT WITH YOUR DUES.  PLEASE PAY AT THIS MEETING AND GET CURRENT SO WE CAN CONTINUE TO BRING FINE PROGRAMS.

CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

 

Want A Tour of the Shiloh Battlefield?  Try David Stewart.

 

If you are heading to Shiloh National Military Park and want something much more than driving around that wonderful site with the Park Service brochure, then a personal guided tour is the thing for you.  David Stewart, of Collierville, TN, offers guided tours of this wonderful battlefield and has been doing so for quite some time.

 

For information about his tours, which include more than Shiloh (like Gettysburg, Brice’s Crossroads and more), what they entail and costs, please visit his web site at – www.shilohcivilwartours.com.  A schedule of group tours and their locations is also posted on the web site.

 

The Civil War On Television (Courtesy of the Cleveland CWRT newsletter)

 

Here’s some Civil War TV programs for your enjoyment.  Nice to see these – hope we can get even more!

 

Antiques Roadshow: The Civil War Years – Artifacts: PBS Monday, January 23, 2017 (7 PM and 3 rebroadcasts)

 

Lincoln Assassination: American Experience (PBS.org) will broadcast “The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln” on January 17, 2017 at 8 PM (ET).

 

More Civil War Television That You Can Watch On Your Computer (Courtesy of the Des Moines, IA CWRT newsletter)

 

C-Span does regular interviews with all sorts of authors including noted Civil War historians.  Please find here a link to the broadcast of Dr. Earl Hess, noted author and professor of history at Lincoln Memorial University in East Tennessee on “Civil War Weapons and Tactics.” This is based on his recent book on the topic which continues the trend of challenging the myth of the rifle musket as being the cause for so much slaughter in the war.

 

https://www.c-span.org/video/?416997-4/civil-war-infantry-tactics-weapons

 

You might spend some time on their web site for other Civil War programs they offer.

 

March Meeting and Newsletter

Clarksville Civil War Roundtable

Founded March, 2004 – Clarksville, Tennessee


March 16th, 2016
– Our 144th meeting.   We continue our eleventh year!
The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, March 16th, 2016 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Gateway Hospital.  This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall.  The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.


Sorry to be so late with the newsletter folks.  I goofed on the date of this month’s meeting.  Let’s have a great turnout!!!


Our Speaker and Topic
   – “Bite The Bullet: Myths And Realities Of Civil War Medicine”

 

“Bite the Bullet” is an overview of the techniques used by the military physicians s of the 19th century military to treat battlefield wounds and disease during the four year conflict of the 1860’s.  Original Civil War medical instruments will be shown to illustrate the medical and surgical treatments used by the Union and Confederate military, the results of those treatments, and how they contrast with the techniques of the modern military medical system.

 

Dr. Anthony Hodges attended the University of Alabama, graduated from UT Chattanooga and the University of Tennessee Center for the Health Sciences in Memphis with a D.D.S. (Doctor of Dental Surgery) degree in 1981.  He is married to a dental school classmate, Dr. Jill Prichard Hodges, an orthodontist, and they have three grown children. They reside on Elder Mountain, just outside of Chattanooga.  Anthony recently retired from dentistry after 35 years of practice.

 

He became interested in early American and Civil War history as a young child due to oral family history passed down to him by elderly relatives in North Alabama.   He began to collect Civil War artifacts as a young boy and items from his collection have been displayed in national parks and museums across the South.   He served as a National Park Service living history interpreter for over thirty years.

 

Anthony began to study Civil War medicine in dental school and has lectured on the topic for nearly forty years.  He assisted Dr. James I. “Bud” Robertson of Virginia Tech and Broadfoot Publishing in the re-printing of the U.S. Army’s official twelve volume medical account of the Civil War, The Medical and Surgical History of the Civil War.  He has written numerous Civil War historical articles for the Chattanooga Times-Free Press during the war’s 150th anniversary.

 

Anthony is currently serving his second term as President of the Friends of Chickamauga-Chattanooga National Military Park and also serves as Vice President of the board of the Tennessee Civil War Preservation Association in Nashville.  Additionally he is Vice President of the East Tennessee Historical Society and Museum of East Tennessee History in Knoxville; and serves on the Advisory Board of the Medal of Honor Museum in Chattanooga.  He is a past Commander of the  Military Order of the Stars and Bars, as well as the Order of the Southern Cross.

 

Last Month’s Program

 

We thank Ross Massey for his entertaining and informative program on Tennessee general and governor William Bate.  Covering his career before, during and after the war, Bate is sometimes looked with askance by some Civil War historians for what is perceived as mediocrity as a division commander.  Much of this is fueled by the e4nmity of the Florida brigade under his command.  While bate made some mistakes, Massey’s program cast a different view on his combat career.  Definitely some food for thought.  Thanks again Ross.;

 

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

 

April 2016 – Tom Parson, Corinth National Battlefield, author/historian – “Work For Giants: The Battle of Tupelo” (based on his recent excellent book)

May 2016 – Brian McKnight, University of Virginia/Wise, author/historian – “Champ Ferguson”

June 2016 – Howard Mann, Nashville CWRT – “The Alton Illinois Prisoner of War Camp and the 10th Kansas Infantry”

July 2016 – Dr. Stephen Davis, historian/author – “Bonnie Blue Flop: Gen. G. T. Beauregard andConfederate Strategy in Fall 1864.”August 2016 – Matthew Hulbert, Kentucky Historical Society – “William C. Quantrill In Kentucky”September 2016 – Gary Waddey, historian/author – “The 11th Tennessee Infantry” (Based on his recent book)

October 2016 – Allen Mesch, historian/author – “General Charles F. Smith” (Based on his recent book.  Smith fought at Fort Donelson and his troops took Clarksville.)

November 2016 – Dr. John Steinberg, Austin Peay State University – “Lincoln and the Russians”

December 2016 – James McDonough, noted author/historian – “General William T. Sherman”  (Based on his new book)


MEMBERS AND DUES
: DUES ARE DUE AT THE JULY 2015 MEETING.  WHEN YOU ARE CURRENT YOU WILL GET A NEW CWRT MEMBERSHIP CARD FOR THE NEXT FISCAL YEAR.  Thanks to all of you, the Clarksville CWRT continues to grow.  We would love to have you join us!  If you have friends interested in the Civil War, please bring them along.  July is our fiscal year when dues for the current campaign were due.  If you haven’t paid your dues for this season yet please do so.  Our dues help us get great speakers and for historical preservation.  Annual dues are as follows:

Ö         Student – $10

Ö         Single membership – $20

Ö         Family – $30

Ö         Military – Active duty and veterans – $15

Ö         Military family – Active duty, veterans, and family – $25


Please plan on paying your dues at this month’s meeting.  If you cannot attend please send payment to Greg Biggs, 2600 W. Henderson Way, Clarksville, TN 37042.


IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A NAME TAG THEN YOU ARE NOT CURRENT WITH YOUR DUES.  PLEASE PAY AT THIS MEETING AND GET CURRENT SO WE CAN CONTINUE TO BRING FINE PROGRAMS.


CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

 

Austin Peay State University History Program – March 31st, 2016 – The Memphis Massacre

 

 

The bitter fighting which defined the Civil War ended starting on April 9, 1865 when Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered  his army at Appomattox Courthouse with further surrenders continuing into May.  But the laying down of arms and the realization of a Union victory did little to quell the fires of hatred in the newly reunited and “reconstructed” United States of America.

 

In May 1866, over a year after the war ended, the city of Memphis exploded in a three-day wave of racial violence directed toward newly-freed African Americans. The devastation was unimaginable: 46 black men and women dead, with 75 more injured. Over 100 black persons were robbed, while 91 homes, four churches and eight black schools were razed to the ground by fire. Women were not spared from the assault, as five women reported being raped.

 

On Thursday, March 31 at 4 p.m. in the Morgan University Center, room 303, Phi Alpha Theta, the National Pan-Hellenic Council and APSU Student Life and Engagement will welcome University of Memphis associate professor Dr. Beverly Bond to campus. Her talk, offered as a part of Women’s History Month, is titled “Oh, I am a Woman! I am a Woman!: Gender and the 1866 Memphis Massacre” and it tackles the impact of what is now known as the Memphis Massacre on its female victims.

The lecture is free and open to the public and is a part of a semester-long project, titled “Memories of a Massacre: Memphis In 1866,” and coordinated by Bond and Susan O’Donovan at the University of Memphis.

 

“What I’m looking at are the events that took place from the perspective of how it impacted women,” Bond said. “I’m looking at the women who were victimized by robberies, rapes, assaults and the destruction of their houses and property and trying to find a common feature in their stories. I think the most common feature I’ve found is the connection the women had to black (Union Army) soldiers and the ease with which they could be identified as having some connection to those men.”

According to reports, the riot started after an alarm went out that African American soldiers from Fort Pickering, on the south boundary of downtown Memphis, had killed several policemen who tried to arrest a black soldier. In response, Union Gen. George Stoneman disarmed the soldiers and locked them in their barracks, leaving nearby settlements vulnerable to the white mobs that soon attacked women, children and defenseless men.

 

Five women came forward to testify to the atrocities committed during the riot, standing before a congressional committee in Memphis to detail the sexual assault they were forced to endure.  “These were women just a year or two out of slavery, and they stepped forward to testify and say ‘we own our bodies and those men had no right to abuse them in this way,’” Bond said.

 

Bond has dedicated years to exploring and events of the Memphis massacre – particularly the plight of the women victimized during the riot. A past president of the Southern Association for Women Historians, Bond is an expert in nineteenth-century African American history with a focus on African American women and their experiences.

 

To learn more about the Memphis Massacre, go to www.memphis.edu/memphis-massacre. For more information on the lecture, contact Dr. Minoa Uffelman at uffelmanm@apsu.edu.

For more information on the APSU Department of History and Philosophy, visit www.apsu.edu/history.

 

Civil War Seminar to Be Held in Huntsville, Alabama – April, 30th, 2016

 

The Tennessee Valley CWRT is again putting on a Civil War symposium down in wonderful Huntsville, Alabama – less than two hours from Nashville.  The date is Saturday, April 30, 2016.  The day long events begin at 9 AM and conclude at 4:30 PM.

 

The seminar will be held at the Marriott’s Springhill Suites, 745 Constellation Place Drive SW, Huntsville, Alabama.  Speakers include:

 

  • Kent Wright (Civil War Navies on River and Sea, Tennessee Valley CWRT)
  • Keynote speaker – Steve Woodworth (Conspiracy to Assassinate President Lincoln – noted Civil War author and professor of history at Texas Christian University)
  • Peggy Allen Townes (From Slavery, to Soldering, to Self-Sufficience local historian and author)
  • John Scales (Did Forrest Make a Difference? – retired Brigadier General U.S. Army, historian and author)
  • Greg Biggs (“The Question Was One Of Supplies:” Sherman’s Logistics in the Atlanta Campaign – historian and author)

The day will conclude with an Interactive Panel Discussion (Q&A-based discussion open to all aspects of the ACW with a panel comprising Kent Wright, Peggy Allen Townes, John Scales, Greg Biggs, David Lady, and Jacque Reeves; and moderated by John Allen)

Registration fee:  $30 for members, $40 for non-members.  (Note that the member price extends to members of neighboring Round Tables – so this is good for members of the Clarksville  CWRT!).  Lunch is on your own with many places nearby.

 

Advance registration required.  Registration cut-off is April 15, 2016.  Please contact Kent Wright for more details at – kdwrt@netzero.coGo ahead and get your spaces early.

 

Please support this fine event which is cheap, fun and not that far from Clarksville – only 2 ½ hours!!!!.  Heck – load up a car with folks and head on down!  Stay overnight and tour Huntsville – lots of things to see and do Civil War and non-Civil War including the Alabama Veterans Memorial Museum loaded with over 30 vehicles and tanks and much more.

 

Parker’s Crossroads Battlefield Civil War Lecture – March 19th, 2016

 

Charles Cox, M.D., author of “Monument to Healing: Two Soldiers and the Good Death, 1862, 1914,”  will speak at the inaugural meeting at 10:00 a.m., March 19 of “Parkers Crossroads Battlefield Kennerly-Cupples Lectureships” held in the Activities Building at Parkers Crossroads.  This is located at 50 Federal Lane, Hwy 22/I-40, Exit 108, Parker’s Crossroads, TN 38388.

 

Dr. Cox will speak on his book and research, including the significance of the railroads in the war, and then open the floor for questions. The meeting will break for lunch at noon and then attendees will tour of a specific area of the battlefield at 1:30 pm. The complete battlefield tour normally takes several hours. For more information, contact, Deborah Teague, Parkers Crossroads Battlefield Association President, at  (731) 845-3114

 

December News and Meeting Information

December 16th, 2015 – Our 141st meeting.   We continue our eleventh year!
The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, December 16th, 2015 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Gateway Hospital.  This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall.  The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.


Our Speaker and Topic
 – “The U.S. Army in the Civil War”

 

Hundreds of volunteer regiments – infantry, cavalry and artillery – were raised to fight in the Civil War by the Union Army.  Most of these men had not had any pre-war militia or military service of any kind as the concept of a large standing professional army was anathema to some fearing such an entity as a threat to liberty.  Some had served in the volunteer regiments raised for the Mexican War while others had some militia experience.  But many today forget that the U.S. Army of some 16,500 officers and men was a very well trained and led professional force with lots of experience fighting Indians from Florida to Texas and the Western Plains.

 

Our speaker this month, retired Chief Ranger of Fort Donelson National Battlefield, Michael Manning will inform us of the makeup of this small force and its exploits in the Civil War.  Units fought in the east and west as well as remained in action in the far west during the war.  Included is a brief survey of the Regular Army establishment in the Civil War focusing on the decisions regarding the use of Regular forces during the conflict.  The various staff departments and the use of Regular Army regiments in the different theaters will be examined.

 

Michael Manning recently retired after 26 years with the National Park Service (NPS) having served as the Chief Park Ranger at Fort Donelson National Battlefield, Dover, Tennessee. He previously served in various other NPS areas including Horseshoe Bend National Military Park, Alabama, Fort Larned National Historic Site, Kansas, and Scotts Bluff National Monument, Nebraska. He previously served as the military-related National Historic Landmarks coordinator for the NPS in Oklahoma. He holds a BS degree in Criminal Justice from Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, Oklahoma and an MA degree in Military History from the American Military University. He served five years with the U.S. Navy Seabees as well as another seven years as a First Lieutenant in the Military Police Corps of the U.S. Army Reserve and National Guard. He is also a graduate of the Land Management Police Training Program at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, Georgia. Mike began his historic interpretation work while still a student at Northeastern State University by first volunteering then becoming a part-time Historic Site Attendant with the Oklahoma Historical Society at Fort Gibson Historic Site.  He currently resides in Woodlawn, Tennessee.

 

Last Month’s Program

 

Out of the mouth of babes – we had one of the most entertaining programs in the history of our CWRT when 4th grader Jonathan Walsh gave his fine program, complete with power point, on what happened to the Carter family during the Battle of Franklin.  Inspired by a tour he took there, Jonathan really worked hard on his fine program and had the crowd in his hand the entire time with his historical facts and hilarious comments about his brother Alex and the size of certain things (note – it was not done with typical words covering the size of things).  We really enjoyed having Jonathan with us and hope he works up a new program soon so we can have him back with us.  Thanks Jonathan!

 

 

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

 

January 2016 – Dr. John Steinberg, Austin Peay State University History Department Chair – “Lincoln and the Russians”

February 2016 – Ross Massey, author/historian – “General William Bate of Tennessee”

March 2016 – Dr. Anthony Hodges, historian – “Civil War Medicine”

April 2016 – Tom Parson, Corinth National Battlefield, author/historian – “Work For Giants: The Battle of Tupelo” (based on his recent excellent book)

May 2016 – Brian McKnight, University of Virginia/Wise, author/historian – “Champ Ferguson”

October 2016 – Allen Mesch, historian/author – “General Charles F. Smith” (Based on his recent book.  Smith fought at Fort Donelson and his troops took Clarksville.)


MEMBERS AND DUES
: DUES ARE DUE AT THE JULY 2015 MEETING.  WHEN YOU ARE CURRENT YOU WILL GET A NEW CWRT MEMBERSHIP CARD FOR THE NEXT FISCAL YEAR.  Thanks to all of you, the Clarksville CWRT continues to grow.  We would love to have you join us!  If you have friends interested in the Civil War, please bring them along.  July is our fiscal year when dues for the current campaign were due.  If you haven’t paid your dues for this season yet please do so.  Our dues help us get great speakers and for historical preservation.  Annual dues are as follows:

Ö         Student – $10

Ö         Single membership – $20

Ö         Family – $30

Ö         Military – Active duty and veterans – $15

Ö         Military family – Active duty, veterans, and family – $25


Please plan on paying your dues at this month’s meeting.  If you cannot attend please send payment to Greg Biggs, 2600 W. Henderson Way, Clarksville, TN 37042.


IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A NAME TAG THEN YOU ARE NOT CURRENT WITH YOUR DUES.  PLEASE PAY AT THIS MEETING AND GET CURRENT SO WE CAN CONTINUE TO BRING FINE PROGRAMS.


CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

 

Tennessee Civil War Preservation Association Announce Next Three Star Tour – December 12, 2015

 

The Battle of Sugar Creek

 

TCWPA’s next Three-Star Battlefield Tour will be on Saturday morning,  December 12th.  Join Dr. Kevin Gray and Joe Fowlkes for an exciting tour of the site of the last major Civil War battle in Tennessee: The Battle of Sugar Creek, December 26, 1864.  The tour will begin in Pulaski and on the way to the privately-owned Sugar Creek Battlefield we’ll visit at least two other Civil War sites.  Sugar Creek is where the rear guard of the Army of Tennessee under Nathan Bedford Forrest, with attached infantry, drubbed the pursuing Federals allowing the army to cross into Alabama and safety.  This tour will be through some very pretty parts of Tennessee on a little known but nearly pristine battlefield.

 

Here is the link for online registration: http://www.tcwpa.org/event/three-star-tour-battle-of-sugar-creek-december-12-2015/

Tour Details

  • 8:00-8:30 am:  Check-in and Welcome in downtown Pulaski
  • 8:30 am:         Tour departs Pulaski
  • 1:00 pm:         Tour concludes
  • Car-pooling from Pulaski recommended
  • Rain or Shine – the tour goes.
  • Walking distance:  approximately 1 mile (total) at Sugar Creek on level pastureland.

Additional tour information will be sent to participants prior to the tour.  

 

The tour is free and open to the public.  Pre-registration will be required as the number of participants is limited.    For more information and to reserve your space contact TCWPA at – info@tcwpa.org.  Visit their web site at – www.tcwpa.org

 

71st Anniversary Battle of the Bulge Seminar at Fort Negley – Saturday, December 19th, 2015

 

On Saturday, December 19, 2015, Fort Negley will host a daylong seminar honoring the 71st anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge, the largest battle of the European Theater involving American and British troops.  On December 16, 1944, Adolf Hitler, hoping to destroy the Allied armies in the Ardennes, to capture Antwerp, and to regain a foothold in the west, launched Germany’s final major offensive on the Western Front.  Although the German advance created a bulging wedge in the lines, American troops refused to break.  After ten days of heavy fighting, Allied reinforcements arrived.  The costly counterattack prevented the Germans from reaching their first objective, regaining captured ground.

 

This free seminar will begin at 9:30 AM and last until 4:30 PM with a one-hour break for lunch.  Attendees are encouraged to bring a sack lunch and tour Fort Negley during the break.  The seminar at Fort Negley will be a condensed version of the eight-part Battle of the Bulge series created by local Clarksville historians and Austin Peay State University history department faculty that took place earlier this year.

 

Related displays will include memorabilia and uniforms from the 106th Infantry Division, which had two regiments cut off and captured by the Germans in the Bulge, as well as World War II scale models crafted by members of a Nashville-based group.  World War II veterans are especially invited to share their experiences at the Battle of the Bulge.

 

9:45 AM – The U.S. Army From D-Day to the Ardennes, presented by William Parker, professor,

Austin Peay State University; director, Fort Defiance Interpretive Center, Clarksville, TN

 

10:45 AM – Wacht Am Rhein: The Germans in the Battle of the Bulge, presented by Greg Biggs,

military historian, Clarksville, TN

 

11:45 AM – Lunch on Your Own

 

12:45 PM – My Experience in the Battle of the Bulge, presented by Michael Freeland, veteran, 82nd

Airborne Division; author, Hopkinsville, KY (Mr. Freeland will have copies of his book for sale at this event)

 

1:45 PM – The 106th Infantry Division: The Golden Lions in the Battle of the Bulge, presented by John

Schuler, veteran, U.S. Army Special Forces; historian, Clarksville, TN

 

2:45 PM – The Conquest and American Occupation of Germany, presented by Dewey Browder, PhD, Lt. Col. US

Army (Ret); Professor Emeritus of History, Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, TN

 

3:45 PM – Panel Discussion

 

Seating is limited.  To make reservations or to receive more information, please contact Fort Negley Visitors Center at 615-862-8470 or fortnegley@nashville.gov.

 

Confederate Battle Flag Captured at Franklin, November 30th, 1864, Goes On Display at Carnton in Franklin For One Year

 

The battle flag of the 7th Texas Infantry, captured at Franklin in late November 1864 by the 24th Wisconsin Infantry and brought back to Wisconsin, is now on display in the museum at Carnton Plantation in Franklin.  The flag, part of a private collection, has been loaned to Carnton by its owner.  It was brought back to Wisconsin after the battle and remained there for many years being placed on display in the home town of the captor, a former captain of the 24th Wisconsin.  Thought to have been lost, the banner turned up in 2014 and was purchased and has now been conserved.

 

Although part of Patrick Cleburne’s Division, famous for their blue and white battle flags, the 7th Texas reverted to a flag issued to them in either late 1862 or early 1863 after their exchange from their capture at Fort Donelson.  This flag bears the Southern Cross (or saltier in flag terminology), the unit designation and a series of battle honors.  Unique to this flag is its fifteen white stars, a trademark of several flags associated with units and officer stationed in Mississippi where the Fort Donelson POW exchanges took place.  The flag is identical in style and construction to that of the 50th Tennessee Infantry at the Tennessee State Museum.  According to its history, the flag last flew at Missionary Ridge before being replaced by a Cleburne battle flag when the 7th Texas joined that division in 1864.  That flag remains missing today.

 

Brig. Gen. Hiram Granbury, killed leading his Texas Brigade at Franklin, was originally a company commander in the 7th Texas and was captured with the regiment at Fort Donelson.  The regiment arrived in the Tennessee theater in late 1861 and was first posted to Hopkinsville, KY where their ranks, and those of the Mississippi troops stationed there as well, were decimated by measles and other diseases.  The regiment fought in the Vicksburg Campaign at Raymond and other battles before coming back to Tennessee after Chickamauga.

 

This is a great chance to see a banner captured at Franklin that is not part of any museum collection.

 

July Newsletter and Meeting Notice

July 22nd, 2015 – Our 136th meeting on a special different night!!   We continue our eleventh year!
The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, July 22nd, 2015 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Gateway Hospital.  This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall.  The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.


Our Speaker and Topic
  – “The Battle of Seven Pines, May/June 1862”

 

One of the overlooked battles of the war, Seven Pines was the largest battle in the east up to that time.  It was also the first attack launched by the Army of Northern Virginia.  Taking place between May 31 and June 1, 1862, this fight, also known as Fair Oaks, was the first Confederate attempt to strike back at George McClellan’s Army of the Potomac as they advanced slowly up the Virginia peninsula from Fortress Monroe.

After fighting at Yorktown, Jamestown and Williamsburg, the Confederates abandoned their defenses of the lower Peninsula and fell back on the Confederate capitol of Richmond.  In doing so, they lost the pivotal navy yard at Gosport/Norfolk which led to the destruction of the ironclad CSS Virginia as its draft was too deep to be withdrawn up the James River.  The Confederate government grew concerned about this and wondered when the commander of the Army of Northern Virginia, Gen. Joseph Johnston, would strike back.

At Seven Pines he took his best shot.  With McClellan’s army split by the Chickahominy River, Johnston grabbed his chance and massed his smaller army to attack the two Union corps that had crossed.  On May 31st, despite a tactically complex plan and some Confederate forces taking the wrong road, one Union corps was badly damaged.  Reinforcements arrived in time to stabilize the line and the rest of the attacks became slaughter pens in nature.  Some 11,000 casualties were the result of the two days of fighting that also saw the wounding of Confederate commander Johnston.  For a day, his second in command, G.W. Smith, lead the army and he was replaced a day later by Robert. E. Lee who would lead this army into American military legend.  Within the month, Lee would smash McClellan back from Richmond in the Seven Days battles.

This month’s program offers the twists and turns that complicated an easy plan.  The army was relatively new and not firing on all cylinders (similar problems would plague Lee as well in the Seven Days) but Seven Pines served up an interesting educational experience for the South’s major army.  Teaching us this month is National park Service ranger Robert Dunkerly.  On the staff of the Richmond National Battlefield park in Virginia, he has led tours of Seven Pines sites over the years.

Robert M. Dunkerly is a historian, award-winning author, and speaker who is actively involved in historic preservation and research.  He holds a degree in History from St. Vincent College and a Masters in Historic Preservation from Middle Tennessee State University.  He has worked at nine historic sites, written twelve books and over twenty articles on both the Civil War and Revolutionary War.  His research includes archaeology, colonial life, military history, and historic commemoration.  He is currently President of the Richmond Civil War Round Table, and serves on the Preservation Commission for the American Revolution Round Table-Richmond.  He has taught courses at Central Virginia Community College, the University of Richmond, and the Virginia Historical Society.  Dunkerly is currently a Park Ranger at Richmond National Battlefield Park.  He has visited over 400 battlefields and over 900 historic sites worldwide.  When not reading or writing, he enjoys hiking, camping, and photography.

We hope that you will join us for a wonderful program.

Last Month’s Program

 

We all enjoyed a fine presentation by noted Tennessee based Civil War author and historian Randy Bishop with an overview of the several books and topics of his research.  He has written about touring battlefields in Tennessee and Kentucky as well as Tennessee’s Civil War generals and the Tennessee Brigade of the Army of Northern Virginia.  An entertaining speaker and as nice a guy as you could ever meet, Randy’s program was very well received by our membership.  We look forward to having him back in the future.

 

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

 

August 2015 – Greg Bayne, president, American Civil War Roundtable of the United Kingdom – “Why Europe Didn’t Intervene in the Civil War”

September 2015 – Rob Cross, historian – “

October 2015 – Wayne Motts, Director, National Civil War Museum, Harrisburg, PA – “The Civil War In Artifacts”

November 2015 – Michael Manning, National Park Service retired – “The U.S. Regular Army In The Civil War”

December 2015 – Jonathan Walsh, Fort Donelson CWRT – “Carter Family at the Battle of Franklin”

January 2016 – Dr. John Steinberg, Austin Peay State University History Department Chair – “Lincoln and the Russians”


MEMBERS AND DUES
: DUES ARE DUE AT THE JULY 2015 MEETING.  WHEN YOU ARE CURRENT YOU WILL GET A NEW CWRT MEMBERSHIP CARD FOR THE NEXT FISCAL YEAR.  Thanks to all of you, the Clarksville CWRT continues to grow.  We would love to have you join us!  If you have friends interested in the Civil War, please bring them along.  July is our fiscal year when dues for the current campaign were due.  If you haven’t paid your dues for this season yet please do so.  Our dues help us get great speakers and for historical preservation.  Annual dues are as follows:

Ö         Student – $10

Ö         Single membership – $20

Ö         Family – $30

Ö         Military – Active duty and veterans – $15

Ö         Military family – Active duty, veterans, and family – $25


Please plan on paying your dues at this month’s meeting.


CIVIL WAR AND ASSOCIATED NEWS AND EVENTS

 

Johnsonville State Historic Park Event – Saturday, July 18th, 2015 Features the One and Only Thomas Cartwright

Company “Aytch” Campfire by the Lake

Johnsonville State Historic Park is proud to feature renowned Civil War historian, Mr. Thomas Cartwright of Brentwood, Tennessee, as he performs an amazing, one-man theatrical performance as Confederate private Sam Watkins in “Company Aytch: A Side Show of the Big Show.”  As a first-person performance, you will be drawn directly into the horrors and even the comedies of the Civil War and get to hear first-hand.  Watkins’ amazing experiences are seen from the eyes of a private soldier during the Civil War.  Please arrive early enough to allow for parking and to get a good seat for the “not to be missed” one time only performance.  The program starts at 8 PM but come early to explore this beautiful and historic state park on the Tennessee River.  For more information call the park at 931-535-2789

The park is located off US Highway 70 at New Johnsonville, TN.  Take Tennessee Highway 13 south from Clarksville to US 70 at Waverly (be sure to stop and visit their Civil War fort up on the hill above the town) and turn right on US 70 to the park.

 

Fort Donelson Civil War Roundtable program – Thursday, July 16th, 2015

 

Our neighbors over in Dover, TN are having a wonderful program on Thursday, July 16h, 2015.  The speaker is Shelby Harriel who is a noted historian from Mississippi.  She will be speaking on the topic of Women Soldiers of the Civil War.  A few books and some essays have been written on this topic and now we can enjoy a program locally.

The meeting takes place at 7 PM at the Stewart County Visitors Center which is right across the road from the entrance of Fort Donelson national Battlefield on US Highway 79.  This is about 45 minutes from Clarksville so head over to Dover and have some fun.

For more fun please visit the web site of this CWRT for the daily Civil War trivia quiz.  Let’s see how you do.  Go to – http://www.ftdonelsoncwrt.org/default.asp?13

Fort Donelson National Battlefield Ranger “Battle Chats” – July 2015 Through September 26th, 2015

 

Join a Park Ranger and learn a bit more about the park, the stories we preserve and share, and the resources we protect for future generations.   Meet the Park Ranger at these locations:

(Program will be cancelled in case of inclement weather, intense heat, or staff shortages.)

11:00 am {Every Day} Stop #4, the River Batteries

3:00 pm {Every Day} The Dover Hotel, Stop #10

1:00 pm Sundays: The Fort Stop #3

1:00 pm Mondays: The Confederate Monument, Stop #1

1:00 pm Tuesdays: Smith’s Attack, Stop #5

1:00 pm Wednesdays: Graves Battery, Stop #7

1:00 pm Thursdays: The National Cemetery / Free-State, Stop #11

1:00 pm Fridays: Smith’s Attack Stop #5

1:00 pm Saturdays: National Cemetery/ Free State, Stop #11

 

Atlanta Campaign  Tour Part 2 – The River Line To Jonesboro – October 21st through 25th, 2015

 

Here we go again for the second portion of the Atlanta Campaign tour sponsored by the Lotz House Civil War Museum of Franklin, TN.

The new dates for the tour are Wednesday, October 21st, 2015 through Sunday, October 25th, 2015.  As with last year the tour leaves from Franklin, Tennessee and returns there with parking by the Lotz House as before.  We will tour Joe Johnston’s River Line, Roswell and the Chattahoochie River crossings, the Battles of Moore’s Mill and Peachtree Creek, the Battle of Atlanta,  Ezra Church and Jonesboro. On the way back to Tennessee we will stop at Allatoona Pass battlefield, site of the first battle of Hood’s Tennessee Campaign.

We will also include stops at the Atlanta History Center (one of the finest Civil War museums in the country), the Margaret Mitchell House, the Road to Tara Museum and more.  We will also tour some of Oakland Cemetery where John Bell Hood watched the Battle of Atlanta.  A full itinerary is forthcoming next week for you.

It looks like the prices will be the same as the tour offered in March and I will have these rates sent to you as part of the full tour email.  There is a deadline for doing the tour of September 15 – we need 30 sold and paid for seats for the tour to go.  Refunds are only by substitution of another which you find or if trip does not mature.   There will be rates for single, double and triple room occupancy so you can work that out with friends among yourselves and take the tour together.  We can also post names and contact information of those seeking room mates as well.

Tour guides, as before, will be Greg Biggs and Robert Jenkins.  Bob is THE expert on Moore’s Mill and Peachtree Creek and has done deep research on Ezra Church as well.  He helped us with the Dalton portion of the tour last year.  He has books out on Peachtree Creek and a recent one on Moore’s Mill and the approaches to the Chattahoochee River by Sherman’s army.  Greg has been giving Atlanta tours since 1993 and spent many years walking the fields and has also been published on the campaign.

We will also have three Atlanta historians to speak to us on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights.  We have tentatively scheduled Stephen Davis, noted Atlanta scholar and author (he has a great piece on the Battle of Resaca in the current Blue & Gray magazine in fact) who has written two books on the campaign and is a very entertaining speaker; Brad Butkovich, author of the recent book on the Battle of Allatoona Pass; and Charlie Crawford, president of the Georgia Battlefield Association who will speak to us on efforts to save battlefields in the growing sprawl of Atlanta and other places in Georgia.

So save the date folks!  We look forward to having you join us on the second portion of the Atlanta Campaign tour.  Proceeds will benefit the Lotz House Civil War Museum, a 501 (c) 3 organization.  If interested in the details please send an email to Greg Biggs at – Biggsg@charter.net

Updated Information On Confederate Colonels Now Online

 

Professor Bruce Allardice, author of “Confederate Colonels: A Biographical Register” (U. of Missouri, 2008) has posted on his website a list of updates to that book, compiled as new information and new sources have become available.  The book includes short biographies of numerous area colonels, such as David A. Lynn and William A. Forbes of Clarksville, and Randal McGavock of Nashville.  Among the new material is updates on Nashville area colonels, such as William S. Hawkins’ newly discovered place of burial.  The new research adds new detail to the book; adds a “new” colonel (John C. Tracy of MO). Bruce is always seeking new information so if you have something to share that is not in his wonderful nook or on his web site please contact him and elt him know.

Bruce’s website is www.civilwarbruce.com. The book, loaded with tremendous research and details, is available through the publisher, or Amazon.com.

CLARKSVILLE CWRT OFFICERS

Greg Biggs – President/Programs – Biggsg@charter.net

Eric Good – Vice President – elgood2@msn.com
Karel Lea Biggs – Secretary/Newsletter – karelleabiggs@charter.net
Sherry Hersh – Treasurer – sherry.hersh@cmcss.net

November Meeting Notice and Newsletter!

November 19th, 2014 – Our 128th meeting. We continue our eleventh year!
The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, November 19th, 2014 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Gateway Hospital. This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall. The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public. Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

OUR SPEAKER AND TOPIC: – “Fort Donelson: One Soldier’s Story”

Our program this month is an actual account of the wartime experiences of Dr. John Kennerly Farris, Company, I, 41st Tennessee Infantry, CSA, taken directly from his diary, written in the form of letters to his wife, as he saw it, as he wrote it, as he lived it!

John Kennerly Farris, along with his two brothers, Bud and Sam, enlisted for Confederate service in Company I of the 41st Tennessee Volunteer Army in November of 1861 at Winchester, Tennessee. John was studying medicine at the time and had established a small practice in Decherd. After training at Camp Trousdale, in less than two months, the brothers would have their first real experience of “war” at Fort Donelson where they were captured. While a prisoner at Camp Morton, Indiana, he began keeping a diary in the form of letters to his wife, Mary, with detailed lists of men who served, who were wounded, who took the Union Oath of Allegiance, and when they were exchanged and reorganized in Mississippi. As a practicing physician, he was always eager to learn new treatments for soldiers’ ailments, and kept recipes for various afflictions, including camp cough, mumps, gunshot wounds, itch, and gonorrhea. His journey would take him through various battles in Mississippi, Port Hudson, Chattanooga, Atlanta, Franklin, and Nashville, and shares his thoughts through the four long, hard years he endured — of joy and sorrow, of hope and despair, honor bound at times to a Cause he no longer believed in.

Transcribed, edited, and annotated by his great-granddaughter, Shirley Farris Jones, “Letters to Mary: the Civil War Diary of Dr. John Kennerly Farris,” was first published in 1994. It was revised for a second printing by the Coffee County Historical Society, and came off the press in May 2014. Copies of the book will be for sale at this month’s meeting.

Shirley Farris Jones, Civil War historian and community activist, retired from Middle Tennessee State University, where she had been a staff member for more than thirty years. She has served as President of the Rutherford County Historical Society, the Association for the Preservation of Tennessee Antiquities, Friends of Stones River National Battlefield, and the Martha Ready Morgan Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. In 2003, she was one of the founding members of the Middle Tennessee Civil War Round Table. She is also a member of the Morgan’s Men Association, Daughters of the American Revolution, Daughters of 1812, Colonial Dames XVII Century, and Daughters of the American Colonists.

A direct descendant of two Confederate great-grandfathers, Ms. Jones states that “Civil War history is more than just a hobby; it has been a passion since childhood.” She has had numerous Civil War related articles published over the past three decades and is the author of four books, including “Letters to Mary: the Civil War Diary of Dr. John Kennerly Farris”, “Harvey Calvin Neese: From Coffee County to Cripple Creek”, “The Un-Civil War in Middle Tennessee”, “Murfreesboro in the Civil War”, co-authored with Dr. Michael Bradley, and recently completed the revision for a second printing of “Letters to Mary ”, which came off the press in May.

Ms. Jones has done extensive research on Martha Ready Morgan, including work for artist John Paul Strain in 1993 for his limited edition print, “Morgan’s Wedding.” In 2004, she was awarded the Jefferson Davis Historical Award for Writing and Research for “Martha Ready Morgan: from wife to widow in 630 days”, presented by the United Daughters of the Confederacy.
Ms. Jones is a lifelong resident of Murfreesboro, attended Middle Tennessee State University, and is a graduate of Knox Business College and Leadership Rutherford. She is married to Jerry Jones and they are the parents of one son, Jeff. She has been actively involved in historic preservation efforts throughout the community for many years.

We hope you will join us for this informative program with local interest.

LAST MONTH’S MEETING

We are most grateful for the fine program by David Mowery from Cincinnati who, with his wife Dawn, came to tell us of the famous raid across Indiana and Ohio by John Hunt Morgan in June-July 1863. While its outcome brought the destruction of his cavalry division, Morgan’s raid certainly tied down thousands of Federal troops and caused great consternation among the civilians of these states. Morgan’s Raid remains one of the most colorful events of the war and we were very lucky to have the author of the most recent book on the campaign as our speaker. David’s years of work on the Morgan Trail in Ohio has certainly elevated him to the pantheon of Morgan historians and his knowledge was well on display last month. Thanks David for coming to see us – and to the other CWRTs getting our newsletter – this was a terrific program so be sure to get David for your CWRT.

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

December 2014 – Greg Wade, Franklin CWRT – “Divided Allegiances: Survival on the Home Front: Sequatchie Valley, Tennessee”
March 2015 – Mark Hoffman, historian/author – “The 1st Michigan Engineers and Mechanics in Middle Tennessee” (from his book)
August 2015 – Greg Bayne, president, American Civil War Roundtable of the United Kingdom – “Why Europe Didn’t Intervene in the Civil War”

MEMBERS AND DUES: – DUES ARE DUE AT THE JULY 2014 MEETING. WHEN YOU ARE CURRENT YOU WILL GET A NEW CWRT MEMBERSHIP CARD FOR THE NEXT FISCAL YEAR. Thanks to all of you, the Clarksville CWRT continues to grow. We would love to have you join us! If you have friends interested in the Civil War, please bring them along. July is our fiscal year when dues for the current campaign were due. If you haven’t paid your dues for this season yet please do so. Our dues help us get great speakers and for historical preservation. Annual dues are as follows:
 Student – $10
 Single membership – $20
 Family – $30
 Military – Active duty and veterans – $15
 Military family – Active duty, veterans, and family – $25

Your annual dues for the 2014-2015 campaign are due at this meeting. Please plan on handling that this month. You will get a new membership card after the dues are paid. Thanks for your support!

CIVIL WAR AND ASSOCIATED NEWS AND EVENTS

Fort Donelson Book Club Meeting – November 25th, 2014

The Fort Donelson Book Club, Dover group, meets to discuss the second half of MacKinley Kantor’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Andersonville. We will also watch one of the films from Andersonville National Historic Site. A limited number of copies of this book are available for participants. (Please note special date because of the Thanksgiving holiday.) The program begins at 6 PM.

Middle Tennessee Civil War 150th Events Across Our Area – November-December, 2014

From Spring Hill to Nashville, Middle Tennessee will have a plethora of events to observe the events of 150 years ago. There’s far too many to list here but visit the websites of these organizations for more details and events:

The Lotz House, Carter House, Carnton Mansion in Franklin for tours, events, Ed Bearss dinner and tour and much more. In Nashville, the Battle of Nashville Preservation Society will be part of the many events planned including a symposium, tours and more. Visit their web site and those of Belle Meade, Traveler’s Rest, Fort Negley and others for the information and dates that you need to support them.

July Newsletter and Meeting Notice

July 16th, 2014 – Our 124th meeting. We continue our eleventh year!
The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, July 16th, 2014 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Gateway Hospital. This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall. The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public. Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

OUR SPEAKER AND TOPIC: – “Canada and the Civil War”

Our great neighbor to the north, Canada, was one of the crown jewels of the British Empire in the mid-19th Century. Much is known about how Britain was outraged when one of her steamships was stopped by a U.S. Navy vessel carrying two Confederate diplomats, James Mason and John Slidell. Britain dispatched troops to the Dominion of Canada but cooler heads prevailed. The United State could not fight the Confederates and Great Britain at the same time. Somewhat less known was the activities of the Confederate Secret Service that operated out of Canada. This is about the extent of Canada’s involvement in the American Civil War that most people have heard of. But there was much more.

This month’s special speaker, Conrad Laplante, president of the Ottawa Civil War Roundtable, will bring to our meeting this month an in depth look on how Canada was affected by our Civil War, American-Canadian relations and how the Civil War actually caused Canada. The war was indeed a shared experience.

That being said, there is much that is little known about the Canadian involvement in that amazing conflict. Just look at the index of any of the major works on the Civil War and search for Canada or Canadians and you will find little mention. This program will correct that error. Many of the facts and figures that will be presented will come as quite a surprise. Without giving away too much, there were thousands of Canadians who participated. The blood of Canadians is in the ground of just about every battlefield of the Civil War. We have some heroes, villains, and untold numbers of ordinary soldiers, some of whom achieved remarkable things. All of these stories will be part of the program.

Conrad Laplante was born and raised in Ottawa, the capital of Canada. After a full career with the military (retired as chief warrant officer, Militia) and government civil service, he now devotes his time to studying American-Canadian relations. Conrad graduated from the University of Ottawa with a BA (Honours) History degree, and is the current president of the Ottawa Civil War Round Table. He is the author of a local history book, At Your Target In Front, Fire!, The Story of Connaught Range.

Please join us for what promises to be a very unique and interesting program and welcome our guest from our great neighbor.

LAST MONTH’S MEETING

We are massively informed and entertained last month by Chicago Police Department detective Robert Girardi, noted Civil War author on the murder of Union General William “Bull” Nelson by Union General Jefferson C. Davis. Despite witnesses to the event, and the lack of proper prosecution by the U.S. Army, tied up with the invasion of Kentucky by the Confederate armies of Braxton Bragg and Edmund Kirby Smith, Davis not only got away with the murder, but was promoted to corps command for Sherman’s March to the Sea. Nelson could be arrogant but he backed that up with solid battle performance. The speculation of how Perryville might have been had he been commanding one of Don Carlos Buell’s corps was brought out in Girardi’s program. Besides being an interesting Civil War event, Girardi’s own professional experience as a homicide detective really added tremendously to the program and the study of the case. It was delivered with complete knowledge of the topic and with humor and style. This is one of the best programs the Nashville CWRT has had and we thank Rob, and his guest Paula Walker, president of the Civil War Roundtable of Chicago, the nation’s first CWRT. We were most happy to have them both.

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

August 2014 – Eric Wittenberg, historian, author – topic TBA
September 2014 – Jamie Gillum, historian/Author, Franklin, TN – “Twenty Five Hours To tragedy: The battle of Spring Hill, November 29th, 1864” (based on his new book)
October 2014 – David Mowery, historian/author – Cincinnati CWRT – “John Hunt Morgan’s Great Indiana and Ohio Raid”
November 2014 – Shirley Farris, author/historian – “Fort Donelson: One Soldier’s Story” (CS Surgeon, 41st Tennessee)
December 2014 – Greg Wade, Franklin CWRT – “Hood’s Retreat from Nashville”
March 2015 – Mark Hoffman, historian/author – The 1st Michigan Engineers and Mechanics in Middle Tennessee” (from his book)

MEMBERS AND DUES: – DUES ARE DUE AT THE JULY 2014 MEETING. WHEN YOU ARE CURRENT YOU WILL GET A NEW CWRT MEMBERSHIP CARD FOR THE NEXT FISCAL YEAR. Thanks to all of you, the Clarksville CWRT continues to grow. We would love to have you join us! If you have friends interested in the Civil War, please bring them along. July is our fiscal year when dues for the current campaign were due. If you haven’t paid your dues for this season yet please do so. Our dues help us get great speakers and for historical preservation. Annual dues are as follows:

 Student – $10
 Single membership – $20
 Family – $30
 Military – Active duty and veterans – $15
 Military family – Active duty, veterans, and family – $25

Your annual dues for the 2014-2015 campaign are due at this meeting. Please plan on handling that this month. You will get a new membership card after the dues are paid. Thanks for your support!

CIVIL WAR AND ASSOCIATED NEWS AND EVENTS

More Great News From Franklin, Tennessee on Battlefield Reclamation

The news from Franklin continues to be exciting for saving more and more of that battlefield. According to the recent Save the Franklin Battlefield newsletter, a new parcel just south of the Carter House, currently home to the well known flower shop and one other building, is being purchased for $2.8 Million for the 1.6 acres. Located literally right next to the Carter farm office, this would be a key addition to the site. Funding is planned from grants, donations and other sources. STFB has also secured a strip of land along Meadowland Drive, part of the new Loring’s Advance area by the Carnton Manor. When cleared, the land will be added to that new park land.

Finally, the moving of houses from Cleburne Avenue continues with yet more homes being moved to new locations. The land will be incorporated into the planned Battle of Franklin park that is planned. Restored earthworks, trails and interpretive markers, plus a reconstructed Carter Gin will enhance the visitor experience.

If you wish to contribute to these worth causes please visit the Save the Franklin Battlefield web site at – http://www.franklin-stfb.org

Franklin CWRT Officer Releases Civil War Novel – Broken Valley

Greg Wade, founder and president of the Franklin, TN CWRT, has written a new Civil War novel. Entitled Broken Valley, the book tells of the lives of civilians in and around the Sequatchie Valley in Tennessee located north of Chattanooga. The work focuses on the Barler family and their neighbors. As Mr. Wade presents it:

“This is about “life behind the lines” in the Sequatchie Valley near Chattanooga. It follows a fictional family and the trials of being in such a divided area. It is a historical fiction but based on a lot of fact. There are scenes in Chattanooga and several other states as well. Wheeler’s Raid is described from the point of view of a civilian caught up in it all.”

Greg will be part of a local authors event at the Barnes & Noble Cool Springs is hosting a local author Meet & Greet event on Friday, July 25 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM. Books A Million in Clarksville will also be happy to order the book for you.