Clarksville CWRT Meeting for February

February 19th, 2020 – Our 187th meeting.  We continue our fifteenth year!

The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, February 19th, 2020 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Tennova Hospital.  This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall.  The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

Our Speaker and Topic “Commander William F. Maury, CS Navy”

 

At the beginning of the Civil War, Commander Matthew Fontaine Maury, known in history as “The Pathfinder of the Seas” and “The Father of Oceanography,” left the US Navy and was initially named Chief of Sea Coast, River and Harbor Defenses, for the Confederate States Navy.  Because of his international fame from serving as First Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington D.C. charting the world’s oceans and seas, Maury was eventually sent to England and France as a chief agent in the Confederate Secret Service.

 

One of his most prominent books was “The Physical Geography of the Sea”, known as the first full work on oceanography and some of his other works are still used today.  He charted currents and weather and published them as map sets assisting sailors of his and later eras.  He was also an advocate of a southerly route for the Trans-Continental Railroad as well as a rail line across the Isthmus of Panama to ease trade and shipping.  Maury, born in Virginia but who lived in Franklin, Tennessee during his formative years, worked in the shadows procuring ships for the CSA and as an unofficial Confederate diplomat.  Maury also perfected “electric torpedoes,” which were basically contact mines which greatly damaged Union Navy ships.  He was also a cousin of Abram Maury, Franklin, Tennessee’s founder.

 

In his post-war career, Maury taught at Virginia Military Institute chairing their physics department and advocated for the creation of the Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College, now known as Virginia Tech. An avid geologist, Maury also authored a book on the physical geography of Virginia believing that mining and manufacturing would help the state recover from the Civil War.  Maury also advocated for a land version of the sea oriented weather bureau to help with forecasting and charting winds across America, traveling to Europe to give speeches on the topic seeking their support.

 

Over the last ten years, Franklin’s Chip Hooper has amassed the largest known private collection of Commander Maury’s papers which he calls “The Pathfinder Papers.”  In this month’s program, Hooper will discuss Maury’s role abroad and will share some of his findings from these papers while introducing original letters and documents to the audience.

 

A Middle Tennessee native, Chip Hooper’s 3x Great grandfather, Captain Thomas J. Carothers, served in Company H of the 20th Tennessee Infantry and was severely wounded at the November 1864, Battle of Franklin. Hooper has served on the Boards of the Battle of Franklin Trust, The Historic Franklin Masonic Hall Foundation and the Maury County Historical Society and recently received a research grant from The College of William and Mary.

 

Last Month’s meeting

 

Historian and author James Knight gave us a wonderful study of the Battle of Pea Ridge in Arkansas.  Fought on March 7-8, 1862, the Confederate defeat there tied in with losses at Forts Henry and Donelson, the fall of Clarksville and Nashville and the defeat at Shiloh which, along with the Union push up the Peninsula in Virginia to threaten Richmond, made for a sad spring for the Confederacy.  Using detailed maps and a good description of the terrain issues both sides face, this battle was brought to light in fine fashion.  Union General Samuel Curtis would rise to be a prominent commander in the Trans-Mississippi theater while loser Gen. Earl Van Dorn, would eventually lose army command after again being defeated at Corinth in October 1862 but redeem himself somewhat as a cavalry commander.

 

Jim’s book on the topic is one of only a few ever written on it so get it at your local bookstore on on Amazon.com.  Thanks Jim for coming to see us.

 

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

 

March 2020 – Karel Lea Biggs – historian/teacher – “Quinine in the Confederacy”

April 2020 – Mark Zimmerman, author/historian – “Iron Maidens and the Devil’s Daughters: US Navy Gunboats versus Confederate Cavalry on the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers”

 

Some of our speakers are authors and bring books to sell at our meetings.  Please support them by buying their books.

IMPORTANT –  MEMBERS AND DUES: DUES ARE DUE AT THE JULY 2019 MEETING.  WHEN YOU ARE CURRENT YOU WILL GET A NEW CWRT MEMBERSHIP CARD FOR THE NEXT FISCAL YEAR.  Thanks to all of you, the Clarksville CWRT continues to grow.  We would love to have you join us!  If you have friends interested in the Civil War, please bring them along.  July is our fiscal year when dues for the current campaign were due.  If you haven’t paid your dues for this season yet please do so.  Our dues help us get great speakers and for historical preservation.  Annual dues are as follows:

  • Student – $10
  • Single membership – $20
  • Family – $30
  • Military – Active duty and veterans – $15
  • Military family – Active duty, veterans, and family – $25

Please plan on paying your dues at this month’s meeting.  If you cannot attend please send payment to Greg Biggs, 2600 W. Henderson Way, Clarksville, TN 37042.

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A NAME TAG THEN YOU ARE NOT CURRENT WITH YOUR DUES.  PLEASE PAY AT THIS MEETING AND GET CURRENT SO WE CAN CONTINUE TO BRING FINE PROGRAMS.

CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

 

Indiana Soldier William Cammack Archive Now Online At Fort Negley’s Web Site

 

On October 8, 1864, William Cammack (1835-1867) of Grant County, Indiana joined the 12th Battery, Indiana Light Artillery along with his close friend Addison Baldwin. Within weeks of enlisting, the pair arrived at Fort Negley where they spent the remainder of the war. During that time, William and his family and friends sent more than 100 letters describing life in Nashville and on the home front. William maintained an especially close relationship with his younger brother Calvin who provided regular updates on events back home including deaths, births, enlistments, interactions with the brothers’ many love interests, business transactions, and the occasional run-in with Indiana copperheads. With friends serving across both theaters of war, William received letters from Sharpsburg, Memphis, and New Orleans. William’s letters, approximately 700 pages of written correspondence spanning from 1858 through 1867, reflect a young educated man struggling with adhering to norms established by his Quaker upbringing, with satisfying his duty to his country, and with fulfilling his own ambitions in business. Although Calvin and William’s deaths in 1867 remain a mystery, their letters contain numerous descriptions of lingering illnesses.

 

Fort Negley Park received the Cammack Collection in 2018 via private donation. The following year, the Friends of Fort Negley Park received a grant from the Tennessee Historical Records Advisory Board Regrant Program administered by the Tennessee State Library and Archives. In addition to purchasing the appropriate archival storage materials, the park established a Flickr page for sharing the letters with the public. With the help of Andy Blair and Howard Mann, members of the NCWRT, the page currently features high quality digital scans of more than 60 letters. The page will soon include transcriptions of the letters as well.

 

To view the letters online please visit – Fort Negley Park Archive Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/people/fortnegley/

 

Fort Negley Park’s archive is open to researchers by appointment. For more information on the Cammack Collection or the park’s other holdings, please contact fortnegley@nashville.gov or 615-862-8470.

 

Fort Donelson National Battlefield Anniversary Events This Weekend

 

Our good friends over in Dover have a full slate of events to commemorate the Battle of Fort Donelson set for the public this coming weekend.  Check their web site for the dates and times of each event and head on over and support your local National Battlefield.  Use the link below –

 

https://www.nps.gov/fodo/planyourvisit/calendar.htm

 

Two Events Upcoming At Historic Traveler’s Rest In Nashville

 

Traveler’s Rest kicks off 2020 with another fun and informative event in February.

 

On Saturday, February 15, they will host Joseph McGill of the Slave Dwelling Project for a lecture, campfire discussion, and overnight visit here at Travellers Rest. We are partnering with Belle Meade Plantation and Franklin Masonic Hall to welcome Mr. McGill and the project to Middle TN this winter. Mr. McGill will be spending a night at each site during his stay.

 

Travellers Rest is hosting a full day of free events on February 15, so please check their website, https://travellersrestplantation.org and Facebook page regularly for more information and to register.

 

There are fees for each of these events and those can be found on the web site.

 

The Battle of Franklin Trust Offers A New Documentary

 

The Battle of Franklin Trust presents a new documentary about America’s history and Battle of Franklin, which occurred on Nov. 30, 1864.

Entitled “The Battle of Franklin and the American Experiment,” the documentary traces the American experience from the Declaration of Independence through present day. Highlights include the battlefield reclamation work in Franklin and the Fuller Story project. The documentary focuses heavily on politics and slavery and how America moved toward civil war. The war and various battles are revisited, such as the Battle of Franklin, and the viewer will experience a unique interpretation of the events that redefined America. Before bringing the story to our present day, the torturous path through Reconstruction is put on full display, including a sharp look at Jim Crow and the modern Civil Rights Era.

Starring: Hewitt Sawyers, Shelia Mullican, Ethan Castelo, Brad Kinnison, Chris Williamson, Julian Bibb, Bobby Hargrove, and Battle of Franklin Trust CEO Eric A. Jacobson.

“We are so pleased to release this new project,” said Jacobson. “We hope the documentary will have a lasting impact on Franklin and beyond. Educating everyone on these topics, and what Americans have truly experienced, will hopefully lead to a better understanding of how critically important our civil war was and is.”

Historic Franklin Theatre, 419 Main Street in downtown Franklin

Date: Thursday, February 13

Tickets: $15

Doors Open: 5:30 PM

Commentary Begins: 6:00 PM

Film Begins: 6:30 PM

Run Time: 1 hr 12 min

Q and A: After the film

 

For more information about the film and showing, please visit www.franklintheatre.com or call (615) 538-2076.

BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS!!!!  A Large Selection of New Books Still Available at the Clarksville CWRT This Month!

Danny Gilkey is a retired history professor at Austin Peay State University in Clarksville and he recently donated hundreds of books for the Nashville and Clarksville CWRTs to sell to members and raise funds for speakers for each CWRT.  Thanks to his great generosity these will be available for sale at this month’s meeting!  So come prepared to shop and add some great stuff to your library all while benefitting your CWRT!   Help give these fine books a new home!  Besides Civil War titles, there will also be books on these subjects: colonial and Revolutionary War books, slavery, Reconstruction, later 19th Century wars, World War 1, World War 2, Korea, Vietnam and Cold War topics.  Danny also made a most generous donation of some reference books to the Fort Negley library which is open to the public!

We appreciate those of you who bought from this great book selection last month!  The CWRT needs funds to keep getting in speakers and the book sales go towards that so thank you!  The prices for these great books or 50 per cent off or more so some great deals here for your library!

Please keep buying and supporting your CWRT!  We sold quite a few last month – thank you!

December Meeting is just around the corner!

The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, December 18th, 2019 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Tennova Hospital.  This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall.  The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

Our Speaker and Topic  – “Horses in The War Between The States”

 

In the 1800s, horses and mules provided a majority of transportation in the U.S.  Especially in the rural South, horses and mules were key to the agrarian society.  At least half the population of the country was familiar with their use and care on a daily basis as they lived in rural areas.  This was commonly true until just over 100 years ago when the internal combustion engine began to replace horse and mule locomotion.

When the War Between the States began, the armies on both sides depended upon horses and mules almost exclusively to move artillery, supply wagons, and cavalry in the field. The US Army developed systems to obtain horses in large quantities but the Confederate military depended much more on individual soldiers to do so.  The result was the huge mobilization of equines into military service.  Find out the hows and whys in “Horses in the War Between the States”.

Lt. Colonel (Retired) Ed Kennedy is an Army “brat” whose family is from Mississippi and South Carolina.  Enlisting as a private during Vietnam, Ed subsequently graduated from West Point as an infantryman and served around the world in the Army. He served 19 years on the graduate faculty of the US Army Command and General Staff College (USACGSC) at Fort Leavenworth both on active duty and retired, teaching in three separate departments (tactics, leadership and history).  He retired in 1997 as an assistant professor in the history department where he was the senior military instructor on the Army’s Combat Studies Institute Staff Ride Team.

Over the years Ed has taken military leaders to campaign sites and battlefields to study (both on staff rides and on tours) including those of: Charleston (S.C.), Gettysburg, Chickamauga, Kennesaw Mountain, Vicksburg, Wilson’s Creek, Elkhorn Tavern (Pea Ridge), Lawrence (Kansas), Centralia (Missouri), Sioux Wars / Little Bighorn, Task Force Smith (Osan, Korea), and the Raid on Hammelburg (Germany).  He is a frequent speaker and contributor of articles in professional military and history journals.  He is currently the Communications Officer for the Tennessee Valley Civil War Round Table in Huntsville, Alabama.

We will see you this month at our meeting.

Lastly – July is our new fiscal year so PLEASE plan on paying your annual dues at this meeting if you have not yet paid your dues for last year!  The funds go to paying for our speakers.  If you did not pay last month please plan on doing so this month.  Dues can also be sent to, Greg Biggs, 2600 W. Henderson Way, Clarksville, TN 37042.  Please make payment to the Clarksville CWRT.  Your name badge will be available only if you have paid your dues.

Also, please support your CWRT by buying the books being offered for sale each month.  The funds go to our treasury for our speakers and help us to donate to battlefield causes.  They are priced well below their retail prices and there’s a great selection!

Our September Meeting!

The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, September 18th, 2019 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Tennova Hospital.  This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall.  The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

Our Speaker and Topic  – “Of Monuments and Remembrance – Veteran Commemoration and the Monuments of Shiloh.” 

Shiloh National Military Park, established in 1894 as the nation’s second federally preserved battlefield park, proves an excellent example for demonstrating the evolution of post-Civil War veteran commemoration through each successive generation of how the war was interpreted after the events of 1861-1865.

In this month’s presentation, Fort Donelson National Battlefield Superintendent Brian McCutchen intends to show examples of the more than 150 monuments that dot the 5,000-plus acre battlefield, and how they demonstrate transition of interpretation and legend about specifics such as battle activities, landscape, battle or war cause/purpose, and event outcomes by the generations since.

Brian McCutchen has served as superintendent of Fort Donelson National Battlefield since the fall of 2012.  Since beginning his career in 1992 at Shiloh, he has served in the positions as park ranger, park historian, regional historian, and superintendent of three separate national park units – including Donelson.  He holds under grad and graduate degrees in historic preservation from Southeast Missouri State University, with much of his graduate studies – and into his career – focused on largely on battlefield assessment and restoration and cemetery and monument interpretation and conservation.

Lastly – July is our new fiscal year so PLEASE plan on paying your annual dues at this meeting if you have not yet paid your dues for last year!  The funds go to paying for our speakers.  If you did not pay last month please plan on doing so this month.  Dues can also be sent to, Greg Biggs, 2600 W. Henderson Way, Clarksville, TN 37042.  Please make payment to the Clarksville CWRT.  Your name badge will be available only if you have paid your dues.
Also, please support your CWRT by buying the books being offered for sale each month.  The funds go to our treasury for our speakers and help us to donate to battlefield causes.  They are priced well below their retail prices and there’s a great selection!

August Meeting Notice

August 21st, 2019 – Our 181st meeting.  We continue our fifteenth year!

The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, August 21st at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Tennova Hospital.  This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall.  The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

Our Speaker and Topic  – “General George Gordon Meade: A Leadership Reappraisal”

 

George G. Meade has not been treated kindly by history.  Victorious at Gettysburg, the biggest battle of the Civil War, Meade was the longest-serving commander of the Army of the Potomac, leading his army through the brutal Overland Campaign and on to the ultimate capture of Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox. Serving alongside his new superior, Ulysses S. Grant, in the last year of the war, his role has always been overshadowed by the popular Grant.  This first full-length study of Meade’s entire two year tenure as commander of the Army of the Potomac seeks to bring him out from Grant’s shadow and into focus as one of the top three Union generals of the war.

 

John G. Selby digs deeply into the primary sources to find a general bestride a large army he could manage well and a treacherous political environment he neither fully understood nor cared to engage.  An able career officer appointed to lead the largest and most important Union army in the aftermath of the debacle at Chancellorsville, the very apolitical Meade soon found himself in a political hot seat that ultimately cost him his most precious possession, his reputation.

 

Meade’s time as commander began on a high note, the defensive victory at the Battle of Gettysburg.  But when he failed to fight Lee’s retreating army that July and into the fall of 1863, the political knives came out, and he spent the winter of 1863-1864 struggling to retain his job as the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War sought to have him dismissed.  Confined by strategic and operational parameters established by President Lincoln, Secretary of War Stanton, and General Halleck, Meade saw his army reduced in size and his operational mobility restricted. Meade offered to resign when Grant was appointed commander of all the Union armies in March 1864, but Grant told him to keep his job.  Together, they managed the Overland Campaign and the initial attacks on Petersburg and Richmond in 1864.  This study uncovers a much more active role for Meade in the Virginia campaigns of 1864 than hitherto acknowledged, finding Meade to have more responsibility than usually presented for both the accomplishments and failures of the fighting that year. The study closes with Meade’s role in the Appomattox Campaign, which is another moment of victory and vindication for Meade and his army which is often minimized to enhance the success of Philip Sheridan.

 

By basing his study on the Official Records of the War of the Rebellion, original Meade letters, and the letters, diaries, journals, and reminiscences of contemporaries, Selby shows that Meade was a much more active, thoughtful, and enterprising commander than usually assumed.  At the same time, this sensitive and reflective man accepted a position that was as much political as it was military, even though he knew that the political dimensions of the job might ultimately destroy his reputation, if not his livelihood. Meade predicted much of the criticism that surrounded him for the two years he led the army, but he stubbornly persisted in his job.    He paid a greater price than he anticipated for his leadership, and it is time to re-evaluate more positively his tenure as commander of the Army of the Potomac.

 

Dr. Selby’s book on General Meade will be available at the meeting.

 

     John G. Selby is professor of history at Roanoke College and the former holder of the John R. Turbyfill Chair in History at the same. A Civil War scholar, Selby wrote Virginians at War:  The Civil War Experiences of Seven Young Confederates and co-edited a large collection of published papers, Civil War Talks:  Further Reminiscences of George S. Bernard and His Fellow Veterans.

 

Last Month’s Speaker

 

Dr. Thomas Flagel once again, gave us an amazing program this time on the joint Union and Confederate reunion at Gettysburg in 1913, the topic of his most recent book.  Laced with terrific accounts of the veterans themselves, what they wanted to see and do, often versus what those who organized it and attended to speak at it wanted to do, gave us a tremendous insight of the event.  Humorous at times, sad at others, the program brought us there and Dr. Flagel’s suprb delivery added to it all.  We thank him for coming to see us – cannot wait for him to come back sometime.

 

FUTURE PROGRAMS:

 

September 2019 – Brian McCutchen, Fort Donelson National Battlefield

October 2019 – Dr. David Gregg, pastor, historian – “John Bell Hood in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, 1864”

November 2019 – Dr. Tim Johnson, historian and author, Lipscomb University – “For Duty and Honor: Tennessee’s Mexican war Experience”

December 2019 – Ed Kennedy, historian/author – “Horses In The War Between The States”

January 2020 – James Knight, author/historian – “The Battle of Pea Ridge”

 

Some of our speakers are authors and bring books to sell at our meetings.  Please support them by buying their books.

IMPORTANT –  MEMBERS AND DUES: DUES ARE DUE AT THE JULY 2019 MEETING.  WHEN YOU ARE CURRENT YOU WILL GET A NEW CWRT MEMBERSHIP CARD FOR THE NEXT FISCAL YEAR.  Thanks to all of you, the Clarksville CWRT continues to grow.  We would love to have you join us!  If you have friends interested in the Civil War, please bring them along.  July is our fiscal year when dues for the current campaign were due.  If you haven’t paid your dues for this season yet please do so.  Our dues help us get great speakers and for historical preservation.  Annual dues are as follows:

  • Student – $10
  • Single membership – $20
  • Family – $30
  • Military – Active duty and veterans – $15
  • Military family – Active duty, veterans, and family – $25

Please plan on paying your dues at this month’s meeting.  If you cannot attend please send payment to Greg Biggs, 2600 W. Henderson Way, Clarksville, TN 37042.

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A NAME TAG THEN YOU ARE NOT CURRENT WITH YOUR DUES.  PLEASE PAY AT THIS MEETING AND GET CURRENT SO WE CAN CONTINUE TO BRING FINE PROGRAMS.

CIVIL WAR NEWS AND EVENTS

New Book Of Images by Noted Sherman Photographer George Barnard Now Available

100 Significant Civil War Photographs: Atlanta Campaign by Stephen Davis

 

The American Civil War was the first war in which both sides widely used entrenchments, repeating rifles, ironclad warships, and telegraphed communications. It was also the first American war to be extensively photographed. Mathew Brady, Alexander Gardner, and Timothy O’Sullivan are famous for having made iconic photographs in the Civil War’s eastern theater. George N. Barnard deserves to be ranked in this top tier for his photographic work in the war’s western theater.

 

100 Significant Civil War Photographs: Atlanta Campaign, by Stephen Davis, presents a riveting collection of Barnard’s camera work. Most of the photographs are from Barnard’s time in Atlanta, mid-September to mid-November 1864, during the Federal occupation of the city. Some were published by him in 1866, but many more have appeared in the countless pictorial histories of the Civil War.

 

No comprehensive collection of Barnard’s Atlanta photographs has been published. With this volume, Stephen Davis attempts to advance the scholarly literature of Barnardiana. Two of the photographs reproduced in this book are believed never to have been widely published.

 

About the author: Stephen Davis of Cumming, Ga., is the author of four books on the Atlanta Campaign. He has been studying George Barnard’s photographs for decades.

American Battlefield Trust Raising Funds to Buy Land to Expand Stones River National Battlefield

Our member Howard Mann sent me this important note from the American Battlefield Trust and it indeed warrants inclusion in our newsletter as this will help expand a battlefield in Tennessee that badly needs to add more land to its holdings.  Stones River National Battlefield only owns a little over 20 per cent of the land out of the total battlefield footprint so this chance is terrific – and the price is right!  Also – a big THANK YOU to O’Reilly Auto Parts who decided to sell this important land rather than build their new warehouse on it which would have encroached on the view shed of the battlefield.  This site is along the Nashville Pike.  Well done!  As follows:

Have you ever found something that you thought you had lost forever? Perhaps a photograph, a letter, a piece of jewelry, or something else of great value to you?

If so, then you know exactly how I feel at this moment about the 42-acre tract we have a chance to preserve on the Stones River Battlefield (a.k.a. Murfreesboro) in Tennessee. The parcel is in the core of the fighting and, if saved, would help to connect two widely separated wings of the battlefield that are already protected by the National Park Service. On this land, the soldiers closed out a bloody 1862 and entered the new year with three days of fighting and nearly 25,000 casualties. The Union’s strategic victory at Stones River set the stage for campaigns into the heart of the Confederacy, while providing a much-needed northern morale boost.

We’ve had our eye on this particular tract for years, but when a private company purchased it for development, we thought all hope was lost.

Fortunately, we were wrong. The company that bought the tract, O’Reilly Auto Parts, appreciates the unique history of the property and has generously agreed to sell it to the Trust for preservation.

The purchase price is $4.0 million, but thanks to a state matching grant program created by the hard work of preservationists in Tennessee, together with federal funding, nearly the entire cost is covered. In fact, the Trust needs to raise just $170,000 of the total cost to secure this tract. (That’s a $33.94 -to-$1 match of your donation dollar!)

Please take a moment today to visit our website and read more about the history of this land, then give what you can to secure this precious American history for future generations.

Thank you for your generous dedication,
James Lighthizer
President
American Battlefield Trust

P.S. Please don’t let this incredible opportunity pass us by! We may never again be in a position to preserve such a significant tract of this crucial Civil War battlefield. I implore you to make the most of the $33.94 -to-$1 match by donating to save 42 acres at Stones River today.

https://www.battlefields.org/give/save-battlefields/save-42-acres-stones-river-battlefield?utm_campaign=062519&utm_medium=ask&utm_source=email

The yellow coded tract below is the land that can be saved with your and our donations!

BOOKS BOOKS BOOKS!!!!  A Large Selection of New Books Still Available at the Nashville CWRT This Month!

Danny Gilkey is a retired history professor at Austin Peay State University in Clarksville and he recently donated hundreds of books for the Nashville and Clarksville CWRTs to sell to members and raise funds for speakers for each CWRT.  Thanks to his great generosity these will be available for sale at this month’s meeting!  So come prepared to shop and add some great stuff to your library all while benefitting your CWRT!   Help give these fine books a new home!  Besides Civil War titles, there will also be books on these subjects: colonial and Revolutionary War books, slavery, Reconstruction, later 19th Century wars, World War 1, World War 2, Korea, Vietnam and Cold War topics.  Danny also made a most generous donation of some reference books to the Fort Negley library which is open to the public!

We appreciate those of you who bought from this great book selection last month!  The CWRT needs funds to keep getting in speakers and the book sales go towards that so thank you!  The prices for these great books or 50 per cent off or more so some great deals here for your library!  Please keep buying and supporting your CWRT!

 

Third Annual Congress of Civil War Roundtables – St. Louis, Missouri – September 20-22, 2019

The Civil War Congress was formed to help save and promote struggling CWRTs as well as to help new CWRTs get up and running.  The main design is to have programs that help a CWRT grow and sustain itself.  This is done through the various seminars that members and officers from the nation’s CWRTs can attend.  Also included are tours of local historic sites.

This year’s event is to be held in St. Louis at the Missouri Civil War Museum at Jefferson Barracks just south of the city.  Jefferson Barracks was an important U.S. Army post prior to and during the Civil War and many of the war’s best known officers served there as younger officers including Jefferson Davis, U.S. Grant, Robert E. Lee and more.  The Missouri Civil War Museum is a must-see with the story of the state that had the third largest number of battles being well told.  Loads of artifacts are displayed that help to tell the tale.

Learn from CWRT experts how they are addressing the issues of member recruitment and retention, marketing, fundraising and governance, participate in breakout sessions to discuss topics you define and network with CWRT leaders from around the country.  Find out how you can work with one another for a sustainable CWRT experience.  Eight great speakers will share what they do as well as offer historical lectures.

There will also be opportunities to tour the fabulous Missouri Civil War Museum, hear first-hand from General Ulysses S. Grant, find out how the Missouri guerrilla war was conducted and partisans were hunted through a presentation by author James Erwin and tour the nearby Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery and the Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site (White Haven).

To register for the conference please go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/2019-cwrt-congress-tickets-55844856469?aff=mcivte   The fee is $135 per person.

Lodging

 

Drury Inn & Suites St. Louis Southwest
5 Lambert Drury Place
St. Louis, MO 63088
Telephone: (636) 861-8300
www.druryhotels.com

USE OUR GROUP NUMBER: 2369307

 

Drury Hotels features the following:

 

Free Hot Breakfast – Start every day with make-your-own Belgian waffles, scrambled eggs, sausage, fresh fruit, oatmeal, biscuits and gravy, KELSO+BROS® coffee and more.  Free hot breakfast is served daily from 6–9:30 a.m. on weekdays and 7–10 a.m. on weekends

Free 5:30 Kickback®* – Join us from 5:30–7 p.m. every evening to enjoy free hot food and cold beverages at our 5:30 Kickback®.  We feature a rotating menu of hot food, beer, wine, mixed drinks and soft drinks.

 

Free Wi-Fi Throughout the Hotel – Get the score, check your social networks or email family members from anywhere in the hotel – for free!

 

Free Soft Drinks and Popcorn – Freshly popped popcorn and a refreshing beverage make a great snack!  Stop by the lobby for free soft drinks and popcorn every evening.

 

On-Site Facilities – Take advantage of the business center, fitness center or pool while you’re away from home.  Print your boarding pass, finish a presentation or check e-mail in our business centers.

 

Please make your reservations by Sunday, August 18, 2019 to receive your group rate.  Reservations made after this date will be subject to prevailing rate and availability.   Reservations may also be made by calling 1-800-325-0720 and refer to your group number 2369307.

 

CLARKSVILLE CWRT OFFICERS

 

July Meeting Information!

The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, July 17th, 2019 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Tennova Hospital.  This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall.  The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

Our Speaker and Topic  – “The 1913 Gettysburg Reunion”

 Civil War veterans held reunions on both sides in the years after the Civil War.  Some were held on battlefields; some helped create our National Battlefield parks, and some were healing moments for each side.  What we call PTSD today was unknown back then and trauma from battle was a large problem with many of the same ramifications our troops have today.

The Gettysburg reunion of 1913 was a key reunion in that it was among the first to try and cope with battlefield trauma.  There had been Gettysburg reunions prior to this but, as we will learn, this reunion was different.  Our speaker, Thomas Flagel, has made this a center piece of his new book, War, Memory and the 1913 Gettysburg Reunion, which he will have for sale at this meeting.

Thomas Flagel has spoken to us before.  Dr. Thomas Flagel is an associate professor of History at Columbia State Community College in Tennessee. He holds degrees from Loras College (B.A. History), Kansas State University (M.A., European History), Creighton University (M.A., International Relations), Middle Tennessee State University (PhD., Public History) and has studied at the University of Vienna.

See you Wednesday, July 17th, for our monthly meeting.

Lastly – July is our new fiscal year so PLEASE plan on paying your annual dues at this meeting if you have not yet paid your dues for last year!  The funds go to paying for our speakers.  If you did not pay last month please plan on doing so this month.  Dues can also be sent to, Greg Biggs, 2600 W. Henderson Way, Clarksville, TN 37042.  Please make payment to the Clarksville CWRT.  Your name badge will be available only if you have paid your dues.

Also, please support your CWRT by buying the books being offered for sale each month.  The funds go to our treasury for our speakers and help us to donate to battlefield causes.  They are priced well below their retail prices and there’s a great selection!

June Meeting Info!

The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, June 19th, 2019 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Tennova Hospital.  This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall.  The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

Our speaker this month is Brad Butkovich of Atlanta, GA.   His topic is –  “The Battle of Allatoona Pass”

Atlanta, Georgia, the industrial, food distribution and shipping center of the Confederacy, fell to the Union forces of William T. Sherman on September 2, 1864.  John Bell Hood’s Army of Tennessee fell back first to Lovejoy Station and then moved west to Palmetto, GA so as to be on the railroad from Alabama, part of his new base of supplies.  After reorganizing the army , losing some commanders (notable William J. Hardee) and feting Confederate President Jefferson Davis, Hood soon planned to move north hoping to draw Sherman out from Atlanta and defeat him badly enough to force him to withdraw from Georgia.  It was a forlorn hope at best, but in a campaign of maneuver, moving over many of the same battlegrounds that had been fought over on the way to Atlanta, Hood ruptured the railroad to Chattanooga that supplied Sherman in several places and set his sights on the Union garrison at Allatoona Pass, where warehouses bulged with food, something Hood would badly need as the campaign progressed.  He sent a single division to attack the Federals who were heavily entrenched on two hills above the pass and some of their units were armed with repeating rifles and were supported by artillery.  The attack was a defeat for Hood and it would help to exacerbate his food problems for the rest of the campaign.  Was it the last battle of the Atlanta Campaign or the first of Hood’s Tennessee campaign?  Come see this month at the Nashville Civil War Roundtable!

Brad Butkovich has a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Georgia Southern University. He has published several books on the American Civil War including studies on the Battle of Pickett’s Mill and Allatoona Pass. He has always had a keen interest in Civil War history, photography and cartography, all of which have come together in his current projects. He is currently working on a 3 volume release of Ezra Carman’s Antietam manuscript with a heavy emphasis on maps and visual content.  His books will be for sale at the meeting!

See you Wednesday, June 19th, June 18th for our monthly meeting.

Lastly – July is our new fiscal year so PLEASE plan on paying your annual dues at this meeting if you have not yet paid your dues for last year!  The funds go to paying for our speakers.  If you did not pay last month please plan on doing so this month.  Dues can also be sent to, Greg Biggs, 2600 W. Henderson Way, Clarksville, TN 37042.  Please make payment to the Clarksville CWRT.  Your name badge will be available only if you have paid your dues.

Also, please support your CWRT by buying the books being offered for sale each month.  The funds go to our treasury for our speakers and help us to donate to battlefield causes.  They are priced well below their retail prices and there’s a great selection!

March Newsletter & Meeting Info

The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, March 20th, 2019 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Tennova Hospital.  This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall.  The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public.  Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

Our speaker this month is a second timer in Michael Shaffer of Kennesaw, Georgia.  His topic is –  “In Memory of Self and Comrades: Thomas Colley and the 1st Virginia Cavalry”

The 1st Virginia Cavalry was one of the most famous units from that state and they fought the entire war in the East from 1861 to 1865.  Colley served for most of that time until losing his foot in 1864.  The program is based on his recollections, which is the new book by our speaker.

Michael K. Shaffer is a Civil War historian, instructor, lecturer, author and newspaper columnist.  He is a member of the Society of Civil War Historians, Historians of the Civil War in the Western Theater and Georgia Association of Historians.   Shaffer teaches course at Kennesaw State University’s College of Continuing and Professional Education and lectures to Civil War groups across the country.

He will have copies of his book for sale at the meeting.

Lastly – July is our new fiscal year so PLEASE plan on paying your annual dues at this meeting if you have not yet paid your dues for last year!  The funds go to paying for our speakers.  If you did not pay last month please plan on doing so this month.  Dues can also be sent to, Greg Biggs, 2600 W. Henderson Way, Clarksville, TN 37042.  Please make payment to the Clarksville CWRT.  Your name badge will be available only if you have paid your dues.

Also, please support your CWRT by buying the books being offered for sale each month.  The funds go to our treasury for our speakers and help us to donate to battlefield causes.  They are priced well below their retail prices and there’s a great selection!

Greg Biggs
Clarksville CWRT